Showing posts tagged art.
x

bibliofeminista

Ask me anything   About Me   Reading Suggestions   Books I Love   

Musings on the book industry, technology, women's issues and other important news in my world.


Shop Indie Bookstores

twitter.com/bibliofeminista:

    In Matej Košir’s series Arthistory, which we spotted over at Book Patrol, the Berlin-based photographer is burning books in order to investigate “our contradictory relationship to the violence, namely the use of violence in order to control it (either to stop it or to prevent its reappearing).” His violent act against art reflects the historical concept that the “winner of the violent conflict always has justified reasons to be violent, because he uses his dominance to (re)write the history. Art is, more often than not, instrumentalised, depicting winners as idealised heroes while the loser’s depictions are exposed to iconoclasm.” Click through to Košir’s website to see more of his work.
(via Flavorwire)

    In Matej Košir’s series Arthistory, which we spotted over at Book Patrol, the Berlin-based photographer is burning books in order to investigate “our contradictory relationship to the violence, namely the use of violence in order to control it (either to stop it or to prevent its reappearing).” His violent act against art reflects the historical concept that the “winner of the violent conflict always has justified reasons to be violent, because he uses his dominance to (re)write the history. Art is, more often than not, instrumentalised, depicting winners as idealised heroes while the loser’s depictions are exposed to iconoclasm.” Click through to Košir’s website to see more of his work.

    (via Flavorwire)

    — 1 year ago with 4 notes
    #art  #book  #Pretty Books 
    Suenonius Mandelgreen, red-brown morocco binding with case for miniature books, 1757 (source).

    Suenonius Mandelgreen, red-brown morocco binding with case for miniature books, 1757 (source).

    (via teachingliteracy)

    — 1 year ago with 241 notes
    #art  #book  #vintage  #art book 
    Designed to resemble a library turned on its side, this espresso bar near Grand Central Station was inspired by the Bryant Park Library.

    Designed to resemble a library turned on its side, this espresso bar near Grand Central Station was inspired by the Bryant Park Library.

    — 1 year ago with 18 notes
    #art  #coffee  #coffee coffee coffee  #coffeshops  #bibliophile 
    Bookshelves at the Austrian National Library (Österreichische Nationalbibliothek) in Vienna, July 2012. (via lostsplendor, booklover)

    Bookshelves at the Austrian National Library (Österreichische Nationalbibliothek) in Vienna, July 2012. (via lostsplendorbooklover)

    (via high-violet)

    — 1 year ago with 2684 notes
    #photo  #books  #library  #art 
    Traditional books, dressed to kill… →

    The immediate future of the book is clear. E (electronic) is for easy; P (print) is for posterity. Book readers today are leading double lives. We are faithful to our libraries at home, but stray towards the delights of digital the moment we board a plane, train or automobile.

    The pleasures of E means downloading the new book we fancy, from reviews, word-of-mouth or plain curiosity. The satisfactions of P come from acquiring lovely print editions for our bookshelves. In due course, but not quite yet, the world’s writers and their agents will work out how fully to monetise this double market.

    One unintended consequence of this irreversible trend has been to give the hardback a new lease of life. If the ebook is all about ease, and short attention spans, the ink and paper book must satisfy not just the thrill of reading, but the deep aesthetic pleasure associated with owning, holding and even scenting a favourite text. Already, there are signs that some publishers have cottoned on to this.

    Not since the palmy days of late-Victorian publishing has so much care and attention been lavished on the hardback. Go into any bookshop now and you will find piles of brand-new hardbacks sporting coloured endpapers, scarlet silk bookmarks, heavy, deckle-edged paper and elaborate laminated boards. If Stevenson, Kipling or Conan Doyle were to wander into Waterstone’s today, they would feel quite at home. Selling to high-end readers, admittedly a smaller market, allows the publisher to charge £35, even £40, for the new edition destined for the library shelf…

    The e-publisher’s riposte to beautiful books has time and technology on its side. This is also the age of the book app. 2011 was a milestone year in lots of ways (Arab spring, death of Bin Laden, English cricket revival), but never more so than with Faber’s launch of TS Eliot’s The Waste Land as a book app.

    Even the most devout print-conscious bibliophile could hardly fail to be impressed by the possibilities of reading, and listening to, this great poem in many different formats, including two recordings by the poet himself. Agreed: this treatment works especially well with a long poem, but Jamie Oliver also understands, and is profiting from, the market for the book app.

    In every Darwinian struggle there must be a loser, an injured beast that slinks away into the undergrowth to die, alone and forgotten. Amid the celebrations for the brave new world of E, we should not forget that other kind of P, the trashy, mass market paperback. That’s where the future’s murky, and where the corporate publishers are really worrying.

    I agree with most of McCrum’s stance on the relationship between ebooks versus print books, but I would also add that the mass market paperback may be dying in print, but it is certainly surging in the ebook market.

    — 2 years ago with 8 notes
    #ebooks  #books  #publishing  #print books  #reading  #readers  #technology  #art 
    The Thing Quarterly, a publication that comes “in the form of an object,” has a new issue out featuring the work of author Dave Eggers.
The McSweeney’s founder has given a new meaning to idea of reading in the bathroom. His text is printed on a shower curtain for people to read while getting clean. It costs $65.
The Thing Quarterly has more: “Published on a shower curtain, with the idea that one would read it while showering, this issue is a monologue told to Dave Eggers by his shower curtain. It was produced in collaboration with Izola and is printed on a 72×72 inch PEVA (PVC Free) shower curtain.”

    The Thing Quarterly, a publication that comes “in the form of an object,” has a new issue out featuring the work of author Dave Eggers.

    The McSweeney’s founder has given a new meaning to idea of reading in the bathroom. His text is printed on a shower curtain for people to read while getting clean. It costs $65.

    The Thing Quarterly has more: “Published on a shower curtain, with the idea that one would read it while showering, this issue is a monologue told to Dave Eggers by his shower curtain. It was produced in collaboration with Izola and is printed on a 72×72 inch PEVA (PVC Free) shower curtain.”

    — 2 years ago with 6 notes
    #art  #book publishing  #eggers 
    Guy Laramee is an artist who carves sculptures out of books.
Among his works is an incredible sculpture of the Great Wall of China, called The Great Wall (pictured).
According to his artist’s statement, Laramee is inspired by the “erosion of cultures.”
He writes: “So I carve landscapes out of books and I paint Romantic landscapes. Mountains of disused knowledge return to what they really are: mountains. They erode a bit more and they become hills. Then they flatten and become fields where apparently nothing is happening. Piles of obsolete encyclopedias return to that which does not need to say anything, that which simply IS. Fogs and clouds erase everything we know, everything we think we are.”

    Guy Laramee is an artist who carves sculptures out of books.

    Among his works is an incredible sculpture of the Great Wall of China, called The Great Wall (pictured).

    According to his artist’s statement, Laramee is inspired by the “erosion of cultures.”

    He writes: “So I carve landscapes out of books and I paint Romantic landscapes. Mountains of disused knowledge return to what they really are: mountains. They erode a bit more and they become hills. Then they flatten and become fields where apparently nothing is happening. Piles of obsolete encyclopedias return to that which does not need to say anything, that which simply IS. Fogs and clouds erase everything we know, everything we think we are.”

    — 2 years ago with 7 notes
    #books  #reading  #art  #mediabistro