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bibliofeminista

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Musings on the book industry, technology, women's issues and other important news in my world.


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twitter.com/bibliofeminista:

    I’m sad to take down my festive Christmas tree!

    I’m sad to take down my festive Christmas tree!

    — 1 year ago with 4 notes
    #christmas is over  #christmas tree  #marilyn monroe  #instagram 
    theniftyfifties:

Marilyn Monroe learning her lines.  Photo by Andre de Dienes.

    theniftyfifties:

    Marilyn Monroe learning her lines.  Photo by Andre de Dienes.

    — 2 years ago with 355 notes
    #marilyn monroe  #1950s  #50s  #film  #andre de dienes  #1950's  #50's  #portrait 
    I love her glasses in this film, “How To Marry a Millionaire.”

    I love her glasses in this film, “How To Marry a Millionaire.”

    — 3 years ago with 8 notes
    #marilyn  #marilyn monroe  #how to marry a millionaire  #film 
    The D.C. Book Hunt: Indie Bookstores (Part One)

    My haul

    A New England transplant, I only recently moved to D.C., the land I have long considered to be a place where indie used bookstores do not thrive. It’s a silly assumption I made long ago based on a few people I met from D.C. None of them ever mentioned spotting great deals in a bookstore, loving the scent of used books, or browsing bookstores other than Busboys and Poets (an awesome place for hanging out with a bookstore, fair trade market, and restaurant, but certainly not a place just for book browsing), Kramerbooks (also a fun place to hang out, although expensive and with more restaurant space than bookshelves), or Barnes & Noble, so I just presumed the area was not famous for its indie bookstores. (We are not in Brooklyn or Cambridge anym0re.)

    This past weekend, I decided to see what the D.C. used bookstore scene has to offer. I picked out four stores, all in the Dupont Circle area that looked appealing, based on their company websites: Second Story BooksBooks for AmericaKulturas, and Red Onion Records & Books.

    Saturday morning at 10:45 I left my place, giant duffle bag in hand, and decided to explore Second Story Books first. It’s a short jaunt from the Dupont Metro Station (a two minute walk), housed in an attractive building with $3 book carts out front. The front of the store hosts many of the store’s rare book collection (read: expensive and mostly behind glass) along with recently released fiction and non-fiction hardcovers, all around 50% off retail price and still in immaculate condition. I was tempted by a few, but I didn’t want to weigh myself down with a stack of books just yet. (It’s a book marathon, not a sprint, I kept repeating to myself.) Further back in the store, there was a special edition Harry Potter chest filled with all seven books. It was $100. I took a photo with my BlackBerry and sent it to my father, the Harry Potter lover in the family. I then finally began perusing the fiction, poetry, and non-fiction shelves which were mostly new-ish paperbacks with a few hardbacks thrown in for good measure. It seemed everything was under $10, and most were under $6. Not bad. The collection was mostly comprised of well-known, but not mainstream authors, as in a few Sandra Cisneros’s, Philip Roth’s, and Virginia Woolf’s, but certainly not many mass distributed books by the likes of Mary Higgins Clark or Nicholas Sparks. I left the store with four purchases: The Female Malady by Elaine Showalter; Wild Women: Contemporary Short Stories by Women, Celebrating Women edited by Sue Thomas; Feminist Fairy Tales by Barbara Walker, and Essential Acker: The Selected Writings of Kathy Acker edited by Amy Scholder and Dennis Cooper.

    Next up was Books for America, which was about a three minute walk down the road and situated right next to indie coffee house Soho Tea & Coffee where I took a quick stop for a cappuccino (it was expensive, but awesomely presented in a glass jar). Books for America is more than a used bookstore, it’s the storefront of the larger non-profit organization which distributes new and used books to disadvantaged individuals. According to their website, recipients include “adult and youth literacy programs, youth centers, transitional homeless shelters, hospitals, inner-city and rural schools, military bases, assisted living communities for seniors, veterans hospitals, women’s shelters, hospices, and other such organizations.” In other words, I felt good about where my dollars were going. The store was a lot smaller than Second Story Books, but it also had a bit more of a casual, friendly atmosphere (everyone shopping there seemed to be alone, but was very chatty with workers and other shoppers — and in a good way). It was also considerably less expensive. Most books I saw were under $4.50, though many were $3. I ended up with The Vagina Monologues by Eve Ensler; Savage Beauty: The Life of Edna St. Vincent Millay by Nancy Milford, The Subjection of Womenby Mill (it’s about time I read it!), and The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton. Granted, there were many more mass produced books and self-help books than Second Story Books, but their collections of gender studies books and biographies were much more extensive (and liberal). As I left, a man arrived with three large boxes of books, so I bet the store has a lot of turnover: also a plus. (Sidenote: upon visiting their website again today, I realized that the organization’s director is a Connecticut College alum. Oh how I love my alma mater.)

    The books weighing me down a bit, I took the stroll up to Kulturas, which was about a fifteen minute walk from Books for America. The store sold me before I even went inside with its “Books without Batteries” sticker. Inside, the store was tiny and filled to the brim with bookshelves packed two-books deep, and a rack of vintage clothes and handmade fabrics. Their collection was mostly composed of out-of-print and rare art and photography books, but they also had a big selection of leftist political books and obscure fiction titles. That sold me even more. There was one half-shelf of mass market paperbacks in the back on the lowest shelf which indicated that this too-cool store barely wanted to admit that they sold such books. As I glanced at the art books, I found a first-edition hardback copy of Marilyn by Norman Mailer and had to stop myself from jumping up and down with excitement. I’ve been looking for a good copy of this book for about two years now, and here it was, sitting casually amongst other modern photography books. Perfection. I also ended up purchasing a nice copy of Omeros by Derek Walcott and a first edition of Searching for Mercy Street by Anne Sexton’s daughter, Linda Gray Sexton. The store was the most expensive of the ones I visited on this trip, but it also had the most offbeat-like feel.

    At this point, weighed down by the weight of the books and the thought of my already-lightened wallet, I didn’t end up walking over to Red Onion, which was to be my final stop of the day. Another time.

    All in all, it was a successful day of book hunting, and it proved to me that D.C. does indeed have a decent selection of used and indie bookstores. Next up: Capitol Books, Red Onion, Books Used & Rare, The Lantern, Bartleby’s Books, and Idle Time Books. Are there any others I should add to my list?

    Added to my list: Politics and Prose. Thanks, @apocinki!

    — 3 years ago with 26 notes
    #anne sexton  #book lover  #bookstores  #connecticut college  #d.c.  #indie bookstores  #kulturas  #marilyn  #marilyn monroe  #omeros  #savage beauty  #vagina monologues  #walcott  #wharton  #lit 
    “When you’re famous you kind of run into human nature in a raw kind  of way. It stirs up envy, fame does. People you run into feel that,  well, who does she think she is, Marilyn Monroe? They feel fame gives  them some kind of privilege to walk up to you and say anything to you,  of any kind of nature — and it won’t hurt your feelings — like it’s  happening to your clothes not you.” - Marilyn Monroe

    “When you’re famous you kind of run into human nature in a raw kind of way. It stirs up envy, fame does. People you run into feel that, well, who does she think she is, Marilyn Monroe? They feel fame gives them some kind of privilege to walk up to you and say anything to you, of any kind of nature — and it won’t hurt your feelings — like it’s happening to your clothes not you.” - Marilyn Monroe

    (via marilynmontage)

    — 3 years ago with 844 notes
    #marilyn monroe  #marilyn 
    "Jackie Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe. Every single woman is one of them. Watch this. Jackie. Marilyn. Jackie…MARILYN. Well, Marilyn is really a Joan. Not the other way around."
- Mad Men, “Maidenform” episode. (see next quote. Because obviously all women want to be one or the other, ideally both at the same time.)

    "Jackie Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe. Every single woman is one of them. Watch this. Jackie. Marilyn. Jackie…MARILYN. Well, Marilyn is really a Joan. Not the other way around."

    - Mad Men, “Maidenform” episode. (see next quote. Because obviously all women want to be one or the other, ideally both at the same time.)

    — 3 years ago with 5 notes
    #mad men  #don draper  #jackie kennedy  #marilyn monroe  #maidenform  #ad campaign  #bra